††††††††††††††

May 2013†††††††††††† Peak Climbing Section, Loma Prieta Chapter, Sierra Club††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††††† Vol. 47 No. 5

http://peakclimbing.org - http://www.facebook.com/peakclimbing


General Meeting

 Date††††††††††††††††† May 14, 2013

Time††††††††† 7:30 pm – 9:30 pm

Where ††††† PCC

††††††††††††††††† 3921 E. Bayshore Road

††††††††††††††††† Palo Alto, CA

Program†† Ecuador Peak Climbs - Cayambe & Cotopaxi

Presenter Matthew Blum

In January, Matthew Blum traveled to Ecuador to climb some of the highest peaks in the Andes and see some of the colorful Ecuadorian culture. Traveling with Rainier Mountaineering Inc (RMI), he got to meet a wonderful group from all across America and Canada and he spent 10 days exploring the beautiful countryside. Despite being nearly thwarted by a giant herd of cows on one mountain, some "interesting" politics on another, and the head guide suffering some GI illness, the group persevered. Driving the narrow bumpy mountain roads up to 16,000 feet and staying in rustic mountain lodges on two of the high mountains, they got up for a zero dark thirty alpine start, broke through the clouds in the pre-dawn darkness, climbed a treacherous ice-fall using cut steps and fixed ropes, watched sunrise over the clouds, and with near-perfect weather, got to experience standing high above the clouds on the summits of 18,997 ft Cayambe and 19,348 ft Cotopaxi.

Directions from 101

Exit at San Antonio Road, go east to the first traffic light, turn left and follow Bayshore Rd to the PCC on the corner of Corporation Way. A sign marking the PCC is out front. Park and enter in the back of the building.

Google ††† http://tinyurl.com/28ng

Editor's Notes

Check out the awesome list of trips we have coming up this summer, Big shout-out to Lisa Barboza and Bob Summers for their contributions!

Judy

Chair Column

In February, I attended the American Alpine Club's annual benefit dinner, which honored the remaining living members of the 1963 American expedition to Mt Everest.  Seeing Tom Hornbein, in particular, was a wonderful reminder of what got me into climbing mountains.  I grew up and was still living in the Midwest flatlands when I read his account of his and Willie Unsoeld's incredible ascent of the West Ridge and subsequent high-altitude bivouac on the descent down the South Col route.  The teamwork and trust between partners in pulling off this adventure was a triumph of the human spirit.  Coincidentally, the book "Everest: the West Ridge" was published by the Sierra Club and was my first introduction to the club.

Shortly thereafter I was introduced to the mountains for real upon visiting a high school friend living in Vancouver, BC.  He took me on a scramble in Garibaldi Provincial Park, the Black Tusk, where we hiked up out of rain forest into alpine meadows carpeted in wildflowers and looked down on glaciers flowing off Mt Garibaldi into a turquoise lake.  I was hooked.

Over the years, I've also learned about, and sometimes encountered, some of the incredibly diverse flora and fauna that live in the high and wild places we frequent as climbers.  Some, like the Snow Leopard of the Himalaya, are threatened by our presence.  On May 5, we have an opportunity locally to learn more about these amazing animals, help support efforts to preserve them, and to hear again the story of that amazing climb of the West Ridge.  The Snow Leopard Conservancy is hosting a benefit in San Francisco that features a talk by

Broughton Coburn on his new book "The Vast Unknown: America's First Ascent of Everest".  Here's a link to info: http://snowleopardconservancy.org/wp-content/uploads/2012/07/InviteFinalPrint.jpg

This month's PCS meeting features a presentation by Matt Blum who recently visited another high mountain region PCS'ers have been known to frequent.  Having seen his photos and read his account, he had a richer cultural as well as mountaineering experience in Ecuador than many others who have gone there to climb.  Join us to see and hear his story.

Climb on, 

Terry

Preliminary Trip List For Summer

May 18 or 25, Aaron Schuman -- ?

June 8, Lisa Barboza -- Mt. Brewer, South Guard

July 20, Kelly Maas -- Mt. Acrodetes, from Baxter Pass

July 28-31, Lisa Barboza -- Triple Divide Pk. (Seq.), Lion Rock, Mt. Stewart

August 1-3, Rod McCalley -- Cirque Peak (& 70th Birthday Party)

August 9-12, Kelly Maas -- Center Basin, from Onion Valley

August 24, Kelly Maas -- Tenaya Canyon descent

Sept. 6-8, Lisa Barboza, Rick Booth, & Linda Sun -- Mt. Humphreys (E. arete)

Sept. 14, Lisa Barboza & Daryn Dodge -- North Peak (& LIST-FINISH Party, Saddlebag Lk.)

Sept. 21, Aaron Schuman -- ?

Sept. 23-29, Bob Summers -- Spiller & Whorl Mtns (+?), from Virginia Lakes

PCS Trip Calendar

These are required statements.

Note: CST 2087766-40. Registration as a seller of travel does not constitute approval by the State of California.

Note: All Sierra Club trips require you to sign a Liability Waiver.

http://www.sierraclub.org/outings/chapter/forms/signinwaiver.pdf

May 25 - 26 - Kern Peak

Leader: Lisa Barboza

June 12 - 13 - Dayhikes of Recess and Isaak Walton

Leader: Lisa Barboza

June 15 - 16 - Vogelsang and Fletcher

Leader: Kelly Maas

June 15 - 16 - Silver† Peak

Leader: Lisa Barboza

July 1 - 3 - Julius Caesar, Hilgard, Gabb

Leader: Lisa Barboza

July 4 - 6 - Foerster Peak

Leader: Lisa Barboza

August 3 - 4 - Mount Winchell

Leader: Liza Barboza

August 7 - 8 - Giraud Peak

Leader: Lisa Barboza

August 30 - September 1 - Deerhorn, W Vidette, E. Vidette

Leader: Lisa Barboza

PCS Trip Details

Kern Peak

Goal: Kern Peak (11,510')

Location: Hwy 14 near Hwy 395

Dates: May 25 - 26

Leader: Lisa Barboza

Join us on this beginner trip to climb one of the southernmost Sierra Peaks.† Be prepared for some snow since this is early in the season; but it is a very light year similar to 2012.† Be prepared to sleep on snow, and to purify water.† There will stream crossings so be prepared for minor crossings.† The peak itself is Class 1 and there will be about 4 miles of off-trail hiking.† But most of the climb is on trail.

Day 1: Hike 8 miles to camp and Happy Hour – bring something to share.

Day 2: Hike 4.25 miles to peak and hike out – total of 17 miles and a few thousand feet of gain. TH is 8900 feet.

You must be in good physical condition and be able to hike 17 miles with several thousand feet of gain with a backpack, and have basic backpacking and camping skills.†

This is not a shared commissary and all are responsible for their own food.††

Be prepared to be self-sufficient in lodging, mess, stoves and other gear.† We will decide at the TH on sharing gear.

Our trailhead will be Blackrock Pass TH, which is near the southern Kennedy Meadows off of Hwy 14 near Hwy 395.† Sierra Club policy is not to arrange carpools; but I will send out a list of participants as the time get closer.

Please send recent hiking experience to Lisa.barbozaATgmail.com.

Dayhikes of Recess and Isaak Walton

Goals: Recess (12,813') and Isaak Walton (12,007')

Location: Vermilion Valley Resort

Dates: June 12 - 13

Leader: Lisa Barboza

These are planned as fast and light Class 2 dayhikes.† They are suitable for beginning

climbers.† We will camp near Vermillion Valley Resort (VVR) which is at the end of the Kaiser Pass Road on the shores of Lake Thomas A. Edison, and enjoy their meals and beverages in the evenings.† You must be prepared to cross some snow as this is a relatively early season trip.†

Be prepared to car camp and prepare your own meals.† Come for 1 peak or try for two.

Day 1: Dayhike Recess CL2 –17 mile round trip, 5500 gain.† Weíll start out early, carry daypacks, water purification as needed.† No iceaxe/crampons should be required but just in case bring to the TH.† Much of the climb is on trail, there is substantial CL2 cross-country – enjoy the incredible views of this rarely climbed peak.† Climb peak, and then back to VVR for beverages and meals, or to camp as desired.† The resort offers meals, and great view of Lake Thomas Edison, and victuals as well.

Day 2: Isaak Walton Peak CL2 -† 14 mile round trip, 4500 gain.† Weíll take the ferry from VVR across Lake Edison, climb the peak, and return to VVR for a well earned meal.† Much of the climb will be on trail and there is substantial cross country at Class 2.† This is a suitable trip for a beginning climber.

You must be in excellent physical condition and be skilled in backcountry travel.† Bring water, hardshell, lunch, and prepare for a long dayhike with moderate gain.† There will be some snow, so bring along gaiters and footwear suitable for snow conditions.

We will meet at VVR the night before the climb. Sierra Club policy is not to arrange carpools; but I will send out a list of participants as the time get closer.

Please send climbing resume and recent experience to Lisa.barbozaATgmail.com

Vogelsang and Fletcher

Goals: Vogelsang (11,493'), Fletcher (11,410')

Location: Tuolumne Meadows

Dates: June 15 - 16

Leader: Kelly Maas

This is intended to be an early season warm-up trip - not too strenuous.† Start early Saturday morning from Tuolumne Meadows, and hike

about 8 miles and 1700' to camp near Vogelsang Lake or Fletcher Lake.† If the group is willing, we'll climb a peak on Saturday.† Otherwise we'll just acclimatize.† We'll definitely climb something on Sunday before hiking out.† So I'm not committing to two peaks, and I won't rule out substituting Rafferty Peak for one of the listed peaks.† The peaks are described as class 2, but some reports mention easy class 3.† Contact leader: (408) 378-5311† kellymbase-pcs@yahoo.com† I'll reply after May 20. Leader: Kelly Maas

Silver Peak

Goals: Silver Peak (11,878')

Location: Vermillion Valley Resort

Dates: June 15 - 16

Leader: Lisa Barboza

Day 1: From the Trailhead, close to Vermillion Valley Resort, we will hike past Devilís Bathtub Lake as far up the drainage as we can before the cross over to the pass to Silver peak on day 2.† We will be camping in a delightful meadow sheltered by old-growth Western White Pine and Red fir.† Distance is about 8 miles and 2600 feet of gain, partly cross country.

Day 2: Climb Silver Peak – climb over pass, climb peak, climb back over pass, hike out to TH. Distance is 13 miles and 2500 feet of gain.

Notes: I travel fast and light but am happy to take my time.† Experience has shown itís best to camp high up the drainage and not at Devilís Bathtub lake if you want to climb the peak. And we do.

Leader: Lisa Barboza. Co-Lead: Aaron Schuman.

You must be in excellent physical condition and be skilled in backcountry travel. This trip is suitable for intermediate climbers – the down climb from the pass over to the Silver basin is low CL3.

Be prepared to be self-sufficient in lodging, mess, stoves and other gear.† We will decide at the TH on sharing gear. We will meet at VVR the night before the climb. Details will follow.

Sierra Club policy is not to arrange carpools; but I will send out a list of participants as the time get closer.

Please send climbing resume and recent experience to Lisa.barbozaATgmail.com

Julius Caesar, Hilgard, Gabb

Goals: Julius Caesar (13,200'), Mt. Hilgard (13,361'), Mt. Gabb (13,780')

Location: Near Bishop, east side of the Sierra

Dates: July 1 - 3

Leader: Lisa Barboza

Day 1: From Pine Creek Tungsten Mine, hike in past Honeymoon Lake to Julius Caesar pass.† Climb Julius Caesar (13,200) and descend to camp at Lake Italy.† The distance is 9.6 miles with 5700 feet of gain.

Day 2: From our camp at Lake Italy – attempt two peaks -† Climb Hilgard, then Gabb.† 5200 feet of gain and 10 miles.

Day 3: Climb any peaks missed, and hike out – 1300 gain, and 9.6 miles

Leader: Lisa Barboza Co-lead: Robert Wyka. I have secured permits for 6.

This is an intermediate/strenuous trip on CL2 terrain. Participants must be in superb physical condition to complete the significant elevation gain and mileage.† Be prepared to be self sufficient in lodging, mess, stoves and other gear.† We will decide at the TH on sharing gear.

Sierra Club policy is not to arrange carpools; but I will send out a list of participants as the time get closer. Please send climbing resume and recent experience to Lisa.barbozaATgmail.com

Foerster Peak

Goals: Foerster Peak (12,057')

Location: Granite Creek Campground, Yosemite

Dates: July 4 - 6

Leader: Lisa Barboza

Day 1: Starting at Isperg Pass TH (Granite Creek Campground) hike 9.5 miles with 3300 feet of gain to camp at McGee Lake at 10,100' and enjoy a Happy Hour.

Day 2: Climb Foerster Peak: Trail/Cross Country: 2500 feet of gain and 6 miles RT to climb peak. Our route will be over Long mountain, then return to camp.†† Expect to encounter CL2 terrain, and some snow, bring along gaiters.† Work to get back to the TH (9.5 miles) and drive home.† If needed, a 3rd day to get home.

Leader: Lisa Barboza Co-lead: John Cheslick.† I have secured permits for 8.

This is an intermediate trip on CL2 terrain.† It is intermediate because participants must be in excellent physical condition to complete the significant elevation gain and mileage.†

Be prepared to be self-sufficient in lodging, mess, stoves and other gear.† We will decide at the TH on sharing gear. Sierra Club policy is not to arrange carpools; but I will send out a list of participants as the time get closer.

Please send climbing resume and recent experience to Lisa.barbozaATgmail.com

Mount Winchell

Goals: Mt. Winchell (13,775')

Location: Big Pine, east side of the Sierra

Dates: August 3 - 4

Leader: Lisa Barboza

Day 1: On Trail: From Glacier Lodge TH, proceed up the North Fork of Pine Creek to camp at 5th lake.† If interest, we will have a Happy Hour.† The hiking distance is 6 miles with 3400 feet of gain.

Day 2: Climb Winchell: glacier travel and CL3 climbing: 2600 feet of gain and 4 miles, glacier

travel probable.† Return to camp, hike out 6 miles.

Leader: Lisa Barboza Co-lead: Aaron Schuman.† I have secured permits for 4.

This is an advanced trip with CL3 climbing and glacier travel. Be prepared to be self-sufficient in lodging, mess, stoves and other gear.† We will decide at the TH on sharing gear. Sierra Club policy is not to arrange carpools; but I will send out a list of participants as the time get closer. Please send climbing resume and recent experience to Lisa.barbozaATgmail.com

Giraud Peak

Goals: Giraud Peak (12,608')

Location: South Lake, east side of the Sierra

Dates: August 7 -8

Leader: Lisa Barboza

Day 1: On Trail: From South Lake TH, proceed up to Bishop Pass and camp in upper Dusy

Basin below the peak.† 2400 feet of gain, about 6 miles to camp on Lake 11340 near the Dusy Basin Trail, enjoy Happy Hour.

Day 2: Climb Giraud, gain of 2500, 6 miles RT back to camp, hike out 6 miles to TH.

Leader: Lisa Barboza Co-lead: Aaron Schuman.† I have secured permits for 6.

This is an intermediate trip on CL2 with some CL3 terrain.† It is intermediate because participants must be in excellent physical condition to complete the significant elevation gain and mileage.† Be prepared to be self sufficient in lodging, mess, stoves and other gear.† We will decide at the TH on sharing gear.

Sierra Club policy is not to arrange carpools; but I will send out a list of participants as the time get closer.

Please send climbing resume and recent experience to Lisa.barbozaATgmail.com

Deerhorn, W. Vidette, E. Vidette

Goals: Deerhorn (13,281'), W. Vidette (12,533'), E. Vidette (12,356')

Location:

Dates: August 30 - September 1

Leader: Lisa Barboza

Day 1: On Trail: From Onion Valley TH, climb over Kearsarge pass, drop down to Bubbs Creek, cross the creek near Vidette Creek.† About 3800' of gain and 8.5 miles over the pass to our camp at the Vidette Lakes up Vidette Creek. If we have time, climb West Vidette from our camp- about 1900 of gain.

Day 2: Climb Deerhorn – CL3 climb, about 5 miles RT with 2800 gain.† This is a CL3 climb up the ridge.

Day 3: Climb East Vidette about 6 miles RT, 3000 of gain.† Hike out to Onion Valley TH.

Leader: Lisa Barboza Co-lead: Needed.† I have secured permits for 4.

This is an advanced trip on CL2 with some CL3 terrain.† It is advanced because participants must be in excellent physical condition to complete the significant elevation gain and mileage.† Be prepared to be self-sufficient in lodging, mess, stoves and other gear.† We will decide at the TH on sharing gear. Sierra Club

†policy is not to arrange carpools; but I will send out a list of participants as the time get closer.

Please send climbing resume and recent experience to Lisa.barbozaATgmail.com

Private Trip Calendar

Important: Private trips are not insured, sponsored, or supervised by the Sierra Club. They are listed here because they may be of interest to PCS members. Private trips may be submitted directly to the Scree editor.

June 13 - 15 - Clouds Rest, Merced River Gorge

Leader: Robert Summers

June 21 - Mount Mills

Leader: Lisa Barboza

June 22 - 23 - Bear Creek Spire

Leader: Lisa Barboza

June 29 - July 7 - North and South Kaweah

Leader: Aaron Schuman

July 8 - 14 - Mt. McAdie

Leader: Robert Summers

July 22 - August 2 - The Evolution - West Side Story

Leader: Robert Summers

August 19 - 30 - Peaks Along the Great Western & Kings-Kern Divides

Leader: Robert Summers

August 31 - Sept 9 - Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Leader: Emilie Cortes

September 12 - 15 - Muir Gorge Swimming

Leader: Robert Summers

November 7 - 23: Annapurna Base Camp, Nepal

Leader: Emilie Cortes

Private Trip Details

Clouds Rest & Merced River Gorge

Goals: Clouds Rest (9926')

Location: Tenaya Lake, Yosemite

Dates: June 13 - 15

Leader: Robert Summers

This is a central Yosemite tour starting at Tenaya Lake. The first day will be a climb over Clouds Rest, with a camp along Sunrise Creek. The next day will be an ascent of the Merced River Gorge, continuing up Echo Cr. The last day will be a hike out past the Sunrise lakes and back to Tenaya.†

I have a permit for 6.

Leader:†† Robert Summers†† rsummers@usgs.gov†††† 650 329 4823 wk† w/msg,† 650 324 2341 h† w/o msg

Mount Mills

Goals: Mount Mills (13,451')

Location: Rock Creek, east side of the Sierra

Dates: June 21

Leader: Lisa Barboza

This is a Private Trip: Dayhike from Mosquito Flat TH, hike in past Mills Lake and climb Mt. Mills via the Mills Couloir.† Because it is a narrow couloir, trip size is limited to 4 people.† Bring helmet as there is likely rockfall.† Intermediate to experienced climbers only are allowed on this trip.† The couloir is narrow, often filled with snow – we will try to avoid the snow, but bring along ice axe and crampons as well.† Total gain is 3300 feet, round trip is 9 miles.Leader: Lisa Barboza Co-lead: Sonya Dietrich

Sierra Club policy is not to arrange carpools; but I will send out a list of participants as the time get closer.

Please send climbing resume and recent experience to Lisa.barbozaATgmail.com

Bear Creek Spire

Goals: Bear Creek Spire (13,451')

Location: Rock Creek, east side of the Sierra

Dates: June 22 - 23

Leader: Lisa Barboza

This is a Private Trip: Hike from Mosquito Flat TH and camp at Dade Lake on Day 1, enjoy Happy Hour.† On Day 2, climb Bear Creek Spire, CL4 NW ridge route.† There is a short section of CL4 and we will be protecting climbers as needed, and using a rappel to descend.† Bear Creek Spire is a beautiful peak with incredible views of the surrounding area. This is a roped climb; bring helmet, harness, and climbing shoes if you feel like you need them.† Be prepared for CL3 scrambling as well and potential glacier travel.† I am bringing along climbing gear and a 30m 8.1mm lightweight rope.† The distance is 11 miles RT with 3500 feet of gain.

Leader: Lisa Barboza Co-lead: Sonya Dietrich.† I have secured permits for 4 advanced climbers.† There is a waiting list.

Be prepared to be self-sufficient in lodging, mess, stoves and other gear.† We will decide at the TH on sharing gear. Sierra Club policy is not to arrange carpools; but I will send out a list of participants as the time get closer.

Trip is currently full and there is a waiting list.

North and South Kaweah

Goals: Black Kaweah (13,720'), Red Kaweah (13,720'), Mt Eisen (12,160'), Mt Lippincott (12,265'), Mt Stewart (12,220'), Eagle Scout Peak (12,000')

Location: Above Visalia, California, from Mineral King trailhead

Dates: June 29 - July 7

Leader: Aaron Schuman

Deep in the northern backcountry of Sequoia National Park, arise the tremendous heights of the Great Western Divide and its monumental spur, the Kaweah Peaks Ridge. We will spend one and one-half days backpacking from Mineral King into Big Arroyo via Glacier Pass and Black Rock Pass. At Big Arroyo, we have five days to explore the rugged high country, including an attempt on the daunting Black Kaweah, before making the long hike out.† Leader: Aaron Schuman†††††† a.j.Schuman@gmail.com† Co-leader: Sonja Dieterich†† honukaimi@gmail.com

Difficulty: Class 2 and 3 except for Black Kaweah, which is class 3 plus

Mt. McAdie

Goals: Mt. McAdie (13,680')

Location: Cottonwood Pass, east side of the Sierra

Dates: June 29 - July 7

Leader: Robert Summers

We will hike in from Horseshoe Meadow, by way of New Army Pass and Sky Blue Lake. Mt McAdie will be climbed from the west, above Crabtree Pass. After Mount McAdie, we will descend the north side of Crabtree Pass and camp at the Crabtree Lakes. The tour will continue around the west and north sides of Mount Whitney and out by the North Fork of Lone Pine Creek.

I will be bringing an ice axe and crampons.†

I have a permit for 6.

Leader:† Robert Summers††† rsummers@usgs.gov††††† 650 329 4823† w/msg,† 650 324 2341 h† w/o msg

The Evolution - West Side Story

Goals: Mt. McGee (12,969')

Location: Courtwright Reservoir

Dates: July 22 - August 2

Leader: Robert Summers

For this trip to the Evolution Basin we will go in from Courtwright Reservoir, crossing the LeConte Divide at Hell For Sure Pass. We will then go up into the Evolution Valley, leave the trail near Colby Meadow, and camp at the McGee Lakes.† Then we will cross into the Evolution Basin and camp at Davis Lake. From Davis Lake we will climb Mount McGee.† From just below Davis Lake we will follow the string of small lakes to Martha Lake. We will then recross the LeConte Divide at Confusion Lake, and go out by way of Bench Valley where there are stories of excellent fishing.† There will be significant off-trail travel.

Leader:† Robert Summers††† rsummers@usgs.gov††††† 650 329 4823† w/msg,† 650 324 2341 h† w/o msg

Peaks Along the Great Western & Kings-Kern Divide

Goals: Thunder Mtn (13,588'), Mt. Jordan (13,344'), Genevra (13,055'), Mt. Ericsson (13,608'), Deerhorn Mtn (13,265')

Location: Onion Valley, east side of the Sierra

Dates: August 19 - 30

Leader: Robert Summers

The trip will go in and out over Kearsarge Pass.† From East Lake we will go to a high camp below Thunder Col. We will cross over Thunder Col and climb Thunder Mountain (4th class).†† Then we will move to a camp below Mount Jordan.† The next objective is Mount Jordan (4th class) and Genevra.† Mount Ericsson will be climbed on the way to Harrison Pass, Deerhorn Saddle, and a camp below Deerhorn Mountain, in the upper part of Vidette Creek.† We will climb Deerhorn Mountain and then descend past the Vidette Lakes to the Shorty Lovelace Cabin on Bubbs Creek.

An ice axe is required for the north side of Thunder Col and crampons are recommended.† A rope will be brought for Thunder and Jordan. There will be strenuous off trail travel.

I have a permit for 6.

Leader:† Robert Summers††† rsummers@usgs.gov††††† 650 329 4823† w/msg,† 650 324 2341 h† w/o msg

Mt. Kilimanjaro, Tanzania

Goals: Kilimanjaro (19, 341')

Location: Tanzania

Dates: August 31 - Sept 9

Leader: Emilie Cortes

This is an all female expedition to the roof of Africa with Emilie's new company, Call of the Wild Adventures, Inc. Emilie will be guiding

this trip personally. Kilimanjaro is one of the seven summits and stands at 19,340ft. We will

ascend via the Machame route over 7 days

total. The Machame (aka "Whiskey Route") is

a bit more challenging due to its rolling nature and scramble up the Barranca Headwall, but has a better summit success rate. Climbers

typically try to ascend over 5, 6, or 7 days. The more days you take, the better your chances, so

why fly all that way not summit because you tried to save a day of vacation? While this peak is "just hiking," you will need to train in order to handle 7 days of trekking without rest days and to prepare your body to acclimatize as best it can. This trip is scheduled over the Labor Day holiday weekend to help those who are vacation constrained. There are additional optional extensions to do a camping safari and a trip to the island of Zanzibar. Cost is $3995 (compare to other outfitters!) with a 10% discount for current PCS members. Contact Emilie Cortes at 415-260-3618, emilie@callwild.com, or sign up at http://www.callwild.com/trip.php?id=64.

Muir Gorge Swimming

Goals: Have fun swimming!

Location: Tuolumne Meadows, Yosemite

Dates: September 12 - 15

Leader: Robert Summers

The Muir Inner Gorge is 15 miles downriver from Toulumne Meadows. The gorge can be descended in late season.† The upper part of the gorge is easy wading and swimming.† The lower part is blocked by a rock step that can be down climbed (difficult), rappelled, or jumped.† Below the step the deep pool continues down the gorge and around the corner.† A rappel rope will be available.

Leader:† Robert Summers††† rsummers@usgs.gov††††† 650 329 4823† w/msg,† 650 324 2341 h† w/o msg

Annapurna Base Camp

Goals: Anna Purnapurna Base Camp (13,550')

Location: Nepal

Dates: Npvember 7 - 23

Leader: Emilie Cortes

This is an all female expedition to the famous Annapurna Base Camp in the Annapurna Sanctuary.  Emilie will be guiding this trip personally.

 This challenging trek is one of the most popular in Nepal and for good reason! Annapurna Base Camp (ABC) is surrounded by a cirque of awe-inspiring peaks, including the awesome south

face of Annapurna I (8,091m), in a natural amphitheatre which is quite simply mind-blowing. Our trek starts from Pokhara with a short drive to the road head. A short diversion up to Poon Hill

(3,190m) offers us a chance to obtain great views of Himalayan giant - Dhaulagiri (8,167m). The sunrise views from here are

legendary.

As we climb through ancient oak and

rhododendron forest, across sparkling streams and past waterfalls, the world of snow and ice starts to unfold above us. This combination of villages and terraced fields of millet and rice, coupled by the majestic splendor of Machapuchare (6,993m), Annapurna I and Himchuli (6,441m) make this an extremely rewarding trek. Climbing up the Modhi Khola valley towards the sanctuary, we are teased with views of towering peaks and dizzyingly high rock walls with waterfalls tumbling down into the roar of the river below.

We ascend to Machapuchare Base Camp (3,700m) on the lateral moraine of Annapurana South glacier. The steady climb up to ABC reveals the full splendor of this natural amphitheatre. When we reach our destination, we are spoiled with a 360-degree views of Himalayan peaks, the 'Throne of the Mountain Gods'. 

Cost is $3295 with a 10% discount for current PCS members. Contact Emilie Cortes at 415-260-3618, emilie@callwild.com, or sign up at http://www.callwild.com/trip.php?id=66.

Trip Reports

Telescope Peak, Death Valley NP

March, 2013

By Sonja Dietrich

Participants: Sonja Dieterich (leader), Mumtaz Shamsee, Mammen Jacobs

I got injured on my last attempt to climb Telescope Peak from Shorty's well 4 years ago, and so decided it was time to give it another try. This time, I had planned to shorten the hiking

mileage for summit day and eliminate the car shuttle by staying at Hanaupah Springs for two nights, although that meant there would be a much larger descent necessary. I also was curious to explore the Hanaupah Narrows, which according to Michel Digonnet's book are among the best in the park. Out of 8 people originally signed up, Mumtaz and Mammen were the only brave souls for whom work or health issues did not interfere.

We met at Shorty's Well and started the 10.9 mile hike up the very long, hot and somewhat boring jeep road. We took some shade breaks and got to the springs around 2 pm, where we camped at the confluence of side canyons just below Shorty Borden's mine. The old rusty car that used to sit in that place 4 years ago is now gone, probably washed away by a flood. Looking at the hike ahead of us, we decided to skip exploring the canyons, rest and prepare for tomorrow instead.

We got up at 3 am to start hiking up at 4 am. The first 1/3 of the spur ridge is a bit loose, but once you get on the ridgeline proper it is more solid and copious sheep trails help. It took us 90 minutes for 1200 ft up and timed with the sunrise, we found the faint use trail leading to the saddle just west of us. Once on the saddle, we followed the connecting ridges for 3 miles and 1900 feet up, always keeping closest to the middle fork of Hanaupah Canyon and never getting into a drainage. There are some minor ups and downs, a campsite with an illegal fire ring, rabbits and increasingly dense mahogany and juniper forests. Shortly after 9 am we were at 7800 feet, where we contoured slightly south to get on the prominent spur ridge coming off east from the main north-south ridge of the Panamints along which runs the hiking trail from Mahogany Flats to Telescope Peak. The first half of the climb leads through forest, while the second half is through open sagebrush. Much huffing and puffing got us to the intersection with the trail at 11:30 am. We had 1 hour, 1 mile and

1000 feet left to the peak, which meant we were going to make it!!! There were only a few soft snow patches on the trail. At 12:30 pm, we happily signed the summit register after 8 1/2 hours of good hiking.

At 1 pm, we had 6.5 hours of light left to make it down. Looking down, I realized the ridges in the forested area have some complexity and we really needed to pay attention to neither get into the Class 4+ headwaters of Hanaupah or down the Middle Fork. With careful orienteering, landmarks, and paying close attention not to be pushed into drainages, we got back on the main ridge. On the densely forested path of the main ridge, one ridge very subtly splits off into the Middle Fork, but we caught our error. Generally, if you keep yourself toward the Middle Fork without actually going down too much steep grade, you will remain on the main ridge. Once the forest opens up, navigation becomes easy. Now it was only the question of getting to the top of the spur ridge to Hanaupah Springs during daylight. I was confident we could downclimb the ridge by headlamp, but finding the right one was important. If we had been too slow, we always could have waited a few hours in the balmy night until the moon came out to help us. But it turned out we did not need it after all. We got to the top of the ridge by 6 pm, and were back in the South Fork of Hanaupah Canyon with the last photon of daylight. 16 hours and some very sore quads later, we replenished our water and were in our tents 30 minutes later. The stars that night were spectacular. Hiking out the next day meant back to mostly trudging down the endless jeep road, leaning into the strong wind to prevent being blown off to the side and watching huge sandclouds billowing up from the Mesquite Dunes.

In summary, we all had a good time! I do think this way of hiking Telescope Peak requires probably as much time, about 16 hours for summit day itself, as doing a dayhike from

Shorty's Well to the Peak and back to Mahogany Flats. The latter version has the advantage of much easier navigation on the return part, which can be very safely done entirely by headlamp.

Basin Peak (13,181')

"Posthole City"

April 27, 2013

By Lisa Barboza

On a sunny Saturday in April, we decided to climb Basin Peak near Bishop.† I had some great climbing partners, Bo Meng and Xavier Cambou, intrepid climbers, who were ready for a conditioning climb to high altitude as a start to the climbing season. We drove out the night before and camped near the trailhead.† We used climber.org (Steve Eckertís) great directions to find the trailhead.† The last few miles of road to the TH is not passable by 2WD vehicles unless you have high clearance.† There is one particularly nasty spot that needs high clearance.† The evening was warm even at our TH camp at 7800 feet.

At the trailhead, we started hiking the 6.5 miles and 5500 feet of gain to the peak. The first four miles are on an old mining road –the trail was snow-free and we arrived at Horton Lake at 8:00 AM.† Horton Lake was also snow free, although it did have a scrim of ice floating with the winds back and forth as the day went onward.

basin-mountain.jpg

Above the lakes, snow slopes led to the peak.† We took the standard route, heading above the lake, southwest in a chain of small lakes to about 11000 feet, then southeast to the summit.† The route finding was straightforward, but the snow was not.

The snowcone climb: we did use crampons but didnít need them.† It turned out that the snow was so soft that we postholed, and often.† Temperatures were in the 60s, and when the sun warmed an east face, we postholed a lot.† The postholing made for snow going as we repeatedly plunged deep into a hole, and then required time and assistance to get pulled out.

The summit: we summited at about 1:30 PM; and we were the 3rd party to summit in 2013.† I am sure that the party that summited on Friday the day before us had similar interesting challenges with postholing.† The views at the summit are simply fantastic with Mt. Humphries rising to the south, South Basin and Four Gables to the West, and the bulk of Mt. Tom, at 13,650 rising to our north.† There was little snow on the south sides of the peaks in view – and soft, slushy snow on the north sides – Posthole City.† We didnít linger too long at the summit.

conquering-Basin.jpg

The way back was consumed with trying to avoid postholing and looking forward to glissading down to the small lake at elevation 10,800'.† This small lake was aqua in color from the glacier milk.† So we were looking to have a nice glissade. I started out, a mild slope of about 35

degrees.† After 100 feet, I found that I was no longer glissading – no, I was actually sinking into the snow and making a small crater.† I was able to get down from 11,600 to 10, 800, but it wasnít pretty.† In fact, I had the distinct feeling that I could actually swim through the snow – yes, it was that soft and mushy.† But of course, that didnít work too well and I ended up trying to descend on my stomach – that didnít work either.† Finally, I used the large snow baskets on my poles and attempted to spread my weight over as much area as possible – that worked – I only postholed 25 times and got stuck only twice.† You literally could not walk 10 feet without encountering† a soft spot.

Finally, we gained Horton Lake – and preferred to bushwhack instead of postholing in the softening western snow slopes above the lake. Once at the lake, we tromped down to the trailhead, arriving at 7PM.† So a 12.5 hour trip, over 5400 gain, made slower by about 1-2 hours worth of postholing and escaping from postholing.† After 40 minutes on the road back to Bishop, we enjoyed a great dinner at Whiskey Creek and drove to our overnight camp.† All in all, great climbing partners, and a fun conditioning trip for a summer of Sierra climbing.

Elected Officials

Chair

Terry Cline/ terry_cline@yahoo.com

Vice Chair and Trip Scheduler

Rod McCalley/rodmccalley@sbcglobal.net

††† 650-493-2378

Treasurer and Membership Roster (address changes)

Yoni Novat

Publicity Committee Positions

Scree Editor

††† Judy Molland / screeeditor@gmail.com

PCS World Wide Web Publisher
††† Joe Baker/ pcs@joebaker.us

††† 650-440-2810

Joining the PCS is easy.† Go to†† http://www.peakclimbing.org/join

PCS Announcement Listserv

If you join the PCS Announcement Listserv you will receive announcements and updates of trips and meetings. Use the http://lists.sierraclub.org/SCRIPTS/WA.EXE?A0=LOMAP-PCS-ANNOUNCE&X=&Y= web page.

Climbing Classifications

The following trip classifications are to assist you in choosing trips for which you are qualified. No simple rating system can anticipate all possible conditions.
††† Class 1: Walking on a trail.
††† Class 2: Climbing using hands for balance.
††† Class 3: Climbing requires the use of hands, maybe a rope.
††† Class 4: Requires rope belays.
††† Class 5: Technical rock climbing.

Trips may also be rated by level of exertion: easy, moderate, strenuous, or extreme.


Deadline for submissions to the next Scree is Friday, May 24. Meetings are held on the second Tuesday of each month.